To determine the quality of hay, Georgia farmers trust forage tests from the University of Georgia Agricultural and Environmental Services Laboratories in Athens, Georgia. The lab provides an estimate of Relative Forage Quality (RFQ). This value is a single, easy-to-interpret number that improves a producer's understanding of forage quality and helps to establish a fair market value for the product. CAES News
To determine the quality of hay, Georgia farmers trust forage tests from the University of Georgia Agricultural and Environmental Services Laboratories in Athens, Georgia. The lab provides an estimate of Relative Forage Quality (RFQ). This value is a single, easy-to-interpret number that improves a producer's understanding of forage quality and helps to establish a fair market value for the product.
Hay Testing
Hay can’t be evaluated by touch, smell, color or any other on-the-spot technique. To get a true measure of forage quality, hay has to be tested.
Hay bales outline a field in Butts County, Georgia. CAES News
Hay bales outline a field in Butts County, Georgia.
Hay Contest
This year, farmers from 13 Southeastern states competed to show off their farm’s best hay or baleage in the 2015 Southeastern Hay Contest.
Andrea Scarrow, UGA Extension Southwest District FACS program development coordinator, speaks during an Annie's Project Workshop held in Albany on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. CAES News
Andrea Scarrow, UGA Extension Southwest District FACS program development coordinator, speaks during an Annie's Project Workshop held in Albany on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015.
Female farmers
Women own 13.6 percent of America’s active farms and their farms produce almost $13 billion worth of goods each year. Just like male farmers, they need access to business and technical information to help make their farms successful. But while many pride themselves on not needing a “women’s only” class on how to work the land or run a business, many other women simply feel more comfortable learning around other female farmers.
Mark McCann will take over on Oct. 1 as the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences assistant dean for Extension for agricultural and natural resources programming. CAES News
Mark McCann will take over on Oct. 1 as the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences assistant dean for Extension for agricultural and natural resources programming.
New ANR Chief
For more than 100 years, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has provided farmers, ranchers and gardeners with research-based training and on-demand information to help them improve their farms and gardens. Starting Oct. 1, a new leader will oversee these vital Extension services in Georgia.
Hay bales outline a field in Butts County, Georgia. CAES News
Hay bales outline a field in Butts County, Georgia.
Hay Contest
Hay doesn’t always get the respect it deserves. You won’t find it featured in any “farm-to-table” magazine spreads or highlighted in a “Got hay?” marketing campaign. Good hay’s not flashy, but without it, great steaks and cheese would be impossible.
Here is a picture of poor forage quality. CAES News
Here is a picture of poor forage quality.
Forage Quality
High quality forage is essential to beef cattle’s nutrition and beef producers’ bottom lines, said University of Georgia Extension forage specialist Dennis Hancock. Focusing on forage quality helps farmers keep overall costs low, he said.
Beef cattle graze in a pasture at the University of Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center in Blairsville, Ga. CAES News
Beef cattle graze in a pasture at the University of Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center in Blairsville, Ga.
Beef Cattle Update
Georgia cattle farmers, with both large- and small-scale operations, will learn useful, research-based information at the annual University of Georgia Mountain Beef Cattle Field Day Thursday, April 16 in Blairsville, Georgia.
Ryegrass forage gets harvested the first of what could be three to four times. CAES News
Ryegrass forage gets harvested the first of what could be three to four times.
Nitrogen Deficiency
In light of recent wet weather, nitrogen deficiency problems have shown up in some small grains and ryegrass fields.
Rows of forage sorghum regrowth after the first cutting. CAES News
Rows of forage sorghum regrowth after the first cutting.
Forage Sorghum

University of Georgia researchers are researching drought-tolerant, alternative forages for the state’s dairy producers to help safeguard their feed supply and save money.

Green acorns lie beneath a tree on the University of Georgia campus in Tifton, Ga. Many species of wildlife can eat acorns with no ill effects, but cows can contract acorn poisoning from eating too many - especially the green ones. CAES News
Green acorns lie beneath a tree on the University of Georgia campus in Tifton, Ga. Many species of wildlife can eat acorns with no ill effects, but cows can contract acorn poisoning from eating too many - especially the green ones.
No green acorns
Squirrels, birds and small wildlife are known to dine on acorns. Cows, on the other hand, can eat a few acorns, but too many can cause deadly acorn—or “Quercus”—poisoning.