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72 results found for Pecans
UGA's newest pecan variety, ‘Avalon’, in 2017. The pecan's extreme resistance to scab disease makes it desirable for pecan farmers looking to replenish their crop after Hurricane Michael. CAES News
UGA's newest pecan variety, ‘Avalon’, in 2017. The pecan's extreme resistance to scab disease makes it desirable for pecan farmers looking to replenish their crop after Hurricane Michael.
New Pecan Cultivar
Georgia pecan producers who are looking to replenish their crop after Hurricane Michael can turn to the ‘Avalon’ variety for a nut that produces high yields and is highly resistant to scab disease, according to University of Georgia pecan breeder Patrick Conner.
Pecans on the ground following Hurricane Michael in Decatur County, Georgia. CAES News
Pecans on the ground following Hurricane Michael in Decatur County, Georgia.
Pecan Yields
Georgia’s pecan growers will have a limited supply this year due to weather conditions that affected the quality of the pecans and Hurricane Michael’s impact, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells.
Damage from Hurricane Michael in Tift County that impacted a pecan orchard. CAES News
Damage from Hurricane Michael in Tift County that impacted a pecan orchard.
Hurricane Michael Impact
To avoid losing their farms following Hurricane Michael, Georgia farmers need financial relief as soon as possible, according to Jeff Dorfman, a professor and agricultural economist in the University of Georgia Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics.
Pecans lie on the ground beneath 20-year-old pecan trees that were uprooted when Hurricane Michael blew through Decatur County, Georgia. CAES News
Pecans lie on the ground beneath 20-year-old pecan trees that were uprooted when Hurricane Michael blew through Decatur County, Georgia.
Pecan Prices
Despite a low supply of Georgia-grown pecans, Georgia producers are faced with lower prices for what remains of the pecan crop after Hurricane Michael. 
Group of truffles. CAES News
Group of truffles.
Truffles
University of Georgia Professor Tim Brenneman now has a newly discovered truffle species named after him: Tuber brennemanii.
Uprooted pecan tree in Tift County due to Hurricane Michael.

10-11-18 CAES News
Uprooted pecan tree in Tift County due to Hurricane Michael.

10-11-18
Ag Disaster Meeting
All farmers with crops and commodities affected by Hurricane Michael are invited to attend an agriculture disaster assistance information session to be held at the University of Georgia Tifton Campus Conference Center at 2 p.m. Monday, October 22.
Hurricane Michael's strong winds uprooted pecan trees in Tift County. CAES News
Hurricane Michael's strong winds uprooted pecan trees in Tift County.
Georgia's Pecan Crop
Georgia’s pecan industry was forever changed by Hurricane Michael’s path of destruction through the southwest part of the state on Oct. 10-11, according to Lenny Wells, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist.
Angelita Acebes is the new Extension pecan entomologist on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
Angelita Acebes is the new Extension pecan entomologist on the UGA Tifton campus.
New Pecan Entomologist
New University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan entomologist Angelita Acebes hopes to find more effective, sustainable solutions for Georgia farmers managing pest insects.
Darrell Sparks was awarded the UGA Inventor of the Year Award in 2018. CAES News
Darrell Sparks was awarded the UGA Inventor of the Year Award in 2018.
UGA Inventor
Darrell Sparks’ legacy at the University of Georgia spans more than 50 years and includes the release of eight patented pecan cultivars and research focused on the development of new and improved pecan varieties. For his contributions to Georgia’s pecan industry, Sparks is the 2018 recipient of the university’s Inventor of the Year Award.
Mounds of red imported fire ants are often found popping up in pastures and in unique spots, like beside this mailbox post in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Mounds of red imported fire ants are often found popping up in pastures and in unique spots, like beside this mailbox post in Griffin, Georgia.
Fire Ant Control
Bait treatment should be applied in southern and central Georgia in April and October to eliminate existing fire ant colonies and their mounds, but reinvasion can occur any time, according to University of Georgia entomologist Will Hudson. Four to six months later, the mounds will reappear, which means homeowners should treat for the pests twice a year, about six months apart.