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Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of tomatoes also controls the shape of potatoes and may control the shape of other fruits as well. CAES News
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of tomatoes also controls the shape of potatoes and may control the shape of other fruits as well.
Fruit Shape
From elongated tubes to near-perfect spheres, vegetables come in almost every size and shape. But what differentiates a fingerling potato from a russet or a Roma tomato from a beefsteak? Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of some of our favorite fruits, vegetables and grains.
The fictional Peter Rabbit isn't the only rabbit that enjoys munching in vegetable gardens. To keep rabbits out of home gardens, University of Georgia Extension specialists recommend building a fence around precious plants. The fence must be at least 2 feet high and must be buried 8 to 12 inches deep. CAES News
The fictional Peter Rabbit isn't the only rabbit that enjoys munching in vegetable gardens. To keep rabbits out of home gardens, University of Georgia Extension specialists recommend building a fence around precious plants. The fence must be at least 2 feet high and must be buried 8 to 12 inches deep.
Rabbit control
Rabbits are often welcomed additions to lawns because many homeowners find them adorable. They love to see rabbits at the edges of their lawns early in the morning or in the evening. However, if the population is left unchecked, rabbits can cost homeowners hundreds, even thousands, of dollars a year in damages.
Esther van der Knaap, professor of horticulture, was one of the many UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers who helped the college break its external research funding record in fiscal year 2016. CAES News
Esther van der Knaap, professor of horticulture, was one of the many UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers who helped the college break its external research funding record in fiscal year 2016.
Tomato Size Regulator
Ever wonder how that slice of tomato on your summer BLT got to be so perfectly bread sized? Geneticists at the University of Georgia have found the gene variants that control a tomato’s size. They published their findings recently in the open-access journal PLOS Genetics.  
Homegrown tomatoes are one of the most popular fruits available at roadside produce stands. CAES News
Homegrown tomatoes are one of the most popular fruits available at roadside produce stands.
Tomato Varieties
Soon soil temperatures will be warm enough for planting those precious backyard tomatoes. Given the many options available, which variety and type of tomato should you choose?
Photos of seeds available at a recent seed swap at the State Botanical Garden of Georgia. CAES News
Photos of seeds available at a recent seed swap at the State Botanical Garden of Georgia.
Save Seeds
Every variety of seed has a story. Some seed varieties can be linked to important historical figures, like Thomas Jefferson. As the growing season for summer favorites comes to an end, consider saving seeds from healthy, vigorously producing plants and begin a seed legacy of your own.
GM crops chart CAES News
GM crops chart
GMO Safety
Genetically modified foods are tested for safety testing before they reach the marketplace. It can take over a decade and cost tens of millions of dollars, and as a result, GMOs are the most safety-tested foods in history, says University of Georgia plant breeding and plant genetics expert Wayne Parrott.
Esther van der Knaap, professor of horticulture, was one of the many UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers who helped the college break its external research funding record in fiscal year 2016. CAES News
Esther van der Knaap, professor of horticulture, was one of the many UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers who helped the college break its external research funding record in fiscal year 2016.
Research Funding
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences broke records in fiscal year 2016 with $69 million in external funding to fuel college projects.
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird. CAES News
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird.
Pollinator Plan
Many food items, including fresh fruits and vegetables, would never make it to grocery store or farmers market shelves without the help of beneficial insects like honeybees and butterflies. The number of these pollinating insects in the U.S. is declining, and to help, Georgia agricultural experts developed a statewide plan to teach gardeners and landscapers how to care for their plants and protect these vulnerable insects that are vital to food production.
Tomato plant with tomatoes in various stages of ripeness CAES News
Tomato plant with tomatoes in various stages of ripeness
Tomato Growing Tips
Whether or not you are trying to grow tomatoes for the first time, or if your a vegetable garden veteran, following some tips from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is sure to make your harvest plentiful.
Green beans grow up a trellis in a Spalding County, Ga., garden. CAES News
Green beans grow up a trellis in a Spalding County, Ga., garden.
Garden Plan
This time of the year gardeners get excited about their soon-to-be-planted spring vegetable gardens. They envision lush rows of perfect pods of peas, scrumptiously delicious sweet corn and big, beautiful tomatoes. University of Georgia Extension urges gardeners to wait and put some thought and vision into their garden first.