Browse Brain Development Stories

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Ines Beltran spent the week of June 15, 2018, teaching UGA Extension's Healthy Brain program, which she developed, to more than 220 Colombian occupational health and psychology students. University Corporation God's Minute's distance education program would like Beltran to teach more programs virtually from Georgia. CAES News
Ines Beltran spent the week of June 15, 2018, teaching UGA Extension's Healthy Brain program, which she developed, to more than 220 Colombian occupational health and psychology students. University Corporation God's Minute's distance education program would like Beltran to teach more programs virtually from Georgia.
Brain Health
Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS) Agent Ines Beltran, of University of Georgia Cooperative Extension in Gwinnett County, recently combined two of her favorite things — teaching people how to improve their health and visiting her home country of Colombia. She taught UGA Extension’s Healthy Brain program to more than 220 students at the University Corporation God’s Minute in Bogotá, Colombia.
University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center and ArunA Biomedical scientists have developed a new treatment for stroke that reduces brain damage and accelerates the brain's natural healing tendencies in animal models. Led by UGA Professor Steven Stice and Nasrul Hoda of Augusta University, the team created a treatment called AB126 using extracellular vesicles (EV), fluid-filled structures known as exosomes, which are generated from human neural stem cells. The tiny tubular shape of an exosome allows EV therapy to cross barriers cells cannot. The exosomes, shown in the photo as small, red punctate clusters, are taken up by neurons, shown as green cell extensions surrounding a blue nucleus. CAES News
University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center and ArunA Biomedical scientists have developed a new treatment for stroke that reduces brain damage and accelerates the brain's natural healing tendencies in animal models. Led by UGA Professor Steven Stice and Nasrul Hoda of Augusta University, the team created a treatment called AB126 using extracellular vesicles (EV), fluid-filled structures known as exosomes, which are generated from human neural stem cells. The tiny tubular shape of an exosome allows EV therapy to cross barriers cells cannot. The exosomes, shown in the photo as small, red punctate clusters, are taken up by neurons, shown as green cell extensions surrounding a blue nucleus.
Stroke Treatment
A team of researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center and ArunA Biomedical, a UGA startup company, have developed a new treatment for stroke that reduces brain damage and accelerates the brain’s natural healing tendencies in animal models.
Associate Professor Franklin West (left) and Emily Baker working with induced pluripotent stem cells generated from a patient's own somatic cells. CAES News
Associate Professor Franklin West (left) and Emily Baker working with induced pluripotent stem cells generated from a patient's own somatic cells.
New Stroke Model
It is well-known in the medical field that the pig brain shares certain physiological and anatomical similarities with the human brain. So similar are the two that researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center have developed the first U.S. pig model for stroke treatments...
The picture represents the sustained presence of labeled neural stem cells (NSCs) within the 'Brain Glue' construct four weeks after a severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), according to University of Georgia scientist Lohitash Karumbaiah who led the team that designed and created Brain Glue. The construct laden with labeled NSCs was delivered directly into the lesion 48 hours post-TBI. CAES News
The picture represents the sustained presence of labeled neural stem cells (NSCs) within the 'Brain Glue' construct four weeks after a severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), according to University of Georgia scientist Lohitash Karumbaiah who led the team that designed and created Brain Glue. The construct laden with labeled NSCs was delivered directly into the lesion 48 hours post-TBI.
'Brain Glue'
Researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center have developed Brain Glue, a substance that could one day serve as a treatment for traumatic brain injuries, or TBIs. 
Technology gifts are on the top of many Christmas lists. If your child received one this holiday, University of Georgia Extension specialists say to review the apps on the device and police any new ones downloaded to the device to ensure that they are appropriate for children. CAES News
Technology gifts are on the top of many Christmas lists. If your child received one this holiday, University of Georgia Extension specialists say to review the apps on the device and police any new ones downloaded to the device to ensure that they are appropriate for children.
Screen Time
Babysitters are no strangers to learning nap time, homework time and meal time quirks. As children gain more access to technology, parents should also share their screen time expectations with babysitters.
Just like their bodies, teenagers' brains are also still under construction and not fully developed. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension family specialists say this phase is a challenging time for teens and sometimes the entire family. Parents must continue to assist teenage "children" as they transition into adulthood. CAES News
Just like their bodies, teenagers' brains are also still under construction and not fully developed. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension family specialists say this phase is a challenging time for teens and sometimes the entire family. Parents must continue to assist teenage "children" as they transition into adulthood.
Teenage Brains
Think back to your teenage years. Did you feel awkward, especially given the changes with your body and emotions? Today’s teens are no different. They are quiet, forgetful and sometimes even surly. They consume large amounts of food and sleep all the time. If I sound like I know them well, I do. I have two teenagers in my home and I have to remind myself daily that they are not little adults. They are experiencing monumental changes that affect their interactions.
Lines of school buses idling outside schools creates harmful air pollution and wastes fuel. To protect students' lung, and save engine parts, bus, and parents' vehicles, should not idle while waiting for students to exit school buildings, University of Georgia experts say. CAES News
Lines of school buses idling outside schools creates harmful air pollution and wastes fuel. To protect students' lung, and save engine parts, bus, and parents' vehicles, should not idle while waiting for students to exit school buildings, University of Georgia experts say.
Return to Structure
Summer break is almost over. That’s right — no more late nights, naps during the day and, my favorite, living without a schedule. While I hate to remind you that our time will no longer be our own, I hope to make it easier for parents, as well as teachers, to return to their respective routines, which includes getting children back to school. As parents, we are instrumental in our children’s educational success. There are some things we can do to prepare little ones for success in the classroom.
This photo represents pseudo-colored MRI T1 maps of a Zika-infected chicken embryo. The embryo was infected with the Zika virus at a time associated with the first trimester of a human pregnancy. The photo captures a well-developed chicken embryo within the egg, and lesion within the brain, attributed to the Zika virus infection. CAES News
This photo represents pseudo-colored MRI T1 maps of a Zika-infected chicken embryo. The embryo was infected with the Zika virus at a time associated with the first trimester of a human pregnancy. The photo captures a well-developed chicken embryo within the egg, and lesion within the brain, attributed to the Zika virus infection.
Zika Virus Research
A University of Georgia graduate student is using early stage chicken embryos to monitor the progression of the Zika virus. By collecting data on how the virus affects brain development, researchers at UGA can pinpoint the best treatments to stop or slow the progression of early-stage microcephaly, a rare birth defect linked to the Zika virus.
A group of students enjoys canoeing on the lake at Rock Eagle 4-H Center in Eatonton, Ga. CAES News
A group of students enjoys canoeing on the lake at Rock Eagle 4-H Center in Eatonton, Ga.
National 4-H Week
Georgia 4-H’s 172,354 student members will celebrate National 4-H Week Oct. 2-8. During the week, the state’s largest youth development organization wants to raise awareness of the program that started as a club for farm kids and has grown into a place that helps youth become successful and confident adults.
5-year-old Parks Powell plays an educational game on his parents' iPad. CAES News
5-year-old Parks Powell plays an educational game on his parents' iPad.
Kids and Tablets
Tablets have become commonplace in today’s classrooms, even as early as preschool or kindergarten. If used appropriately, these touchscreen devices can enhance instruction, according to a UGA Cooperative Extension specialist.