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18 results found for Food Security
UGArden intern Lily Dabbs, a second-year geography major working toward a certificate in urban and metropolitan studies, delivers the first crop of UGArden vegetables to Ava Parisi, UGA Student Food Pantry director and a student majoring in health promotion and behavioral medicine. Photo by Vince Selvidge. CAES News
UGArden intern Lily Dabbs, a second-year geography major working toward a certificate in urban and metropolitan studies, delivers the first crop of UGArden vegetables to Ava Parisi, UGA Student Food Pantry director and a student majoring in health promotion and behavioral medicine. Photo by Vince Selvidge.
UGArden Donations
Food insecurity is an issue among college students that is rarely discussed but all too common. With limited funds or inconsistent income streams, some college students may have to choose between paying rent and buying groceries.
University of Georgia bacteriologist Govind Dev Kumar joined the faculty at the Center for Food Safety on the UGA Griffin campus in Griffin, Georgia, in September of 2018. CAES News
University of Georgia bacteriologist Govind Dev Kumar joined the faculty at the Center for Food Safety on the UGA Griffin campus in Griffin, Georgia, in September of 2018.
Pathogens’ Defense
When humans get sick, our immune systems kick into high gear. To help guard against disease, people are increasingly turning to antimicrobial agents — from soaps to wipes to hand sanitizers — to help kill germs. However, scientists have found that some strains of Salmonella pathogens have developed strategies to evade damage.
Xiangyu Deng, an assistant professor of food microbiology with the Center for Food Safety (CFS) on the UGA Griffin campus. CAES News
Xiangyu Deng, an assistant professor of food microbiology with the Center for Food Safety (CFS) on the UGA Griffin campus.
Source ID
A team of scientists led by researchers at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Georgia, has developed a machine-learning approach that could lead to quicker identification of the animal source of certain Salmonella outbreaks.
CAES Office of Global Programs Associate Director Vicki McMaken, CAES doctoral candidate Davis Musia Gimode and CAES undergraduate Sara Reeves attended this year’s World Food Prize symposium in Des Moines, Iowa. CAES News
CAES Office of Global Programs Associate Director Vicki McMaken, CAES doctoral candidate Davis Musia Gimode and CAES undergraduate Sara Reeves attended this year’s World Food Prize symposium in Des Moines, Iowa.
World Food Prize
Students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) spend a lot of class time discussing ways to end food insecurity, but there are many lessons that can’t be learned in the classroom.
“Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions,” an interdisciplinary roundtable on the challenges facing rural America, will be held in Atlanta Dec. 10-11, 2018, at the Crowne Plaza Atlanta-Airport. CAES News
“Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions,” an interdisciplinary roundtable on the challenges facing rural America, will be held in Atlanta Dec. 10-11, 2018, at the Crowne Plaza Atlanta-Airport.
Combatting Rural Stress
The challenges facing rural America today are diverse, and the answers to rural issues won’t come from a single expert or institution.
A UGA student shows off his mealworm chocolate chip cookie at the UGA Insect Zoo in April 2010. CAES News
A UGA student shows off his mealworm chocolate chip cookie at the UGA Insect Zoo in April 2010.
Eating Insects
Worldwide interest in the art of turning insects into food, known as “entomophagy,” is growing.
University of Georgia Research Professional David Mann works on a portable sequencer in food scientist Xiangyu Deng's laboratory in the UGA Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Georgia. Deng has developed a one-step method of detecting and subtyping food pathogens called “metagenomics analysis.” The method is much quicker than traditional methods, and time is essential during outbreaks of foodborne illness. CAES News
University of Georgia Research Professional David Mann works on a portable sequencer in food scientist Xiangyu Deng's laboratory in the UGA Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Georgia. Deng has developed a one-step method of detecting and subtyping food pathogens called “metagenomics analysis.” The method is much quicker than traditional methods, and time is essential during outbreaks of foodborne illness.
Quicker Identification
Quick, efficient pathogen detection and fingerprinting is essential and often lifesaving when it comes to preventing foodborne illness. University of Georgia food scientist Xiangyu Deng has created a system that can identify foodborne pathogens much quicker than traditional methods.
Canned beans in a pressure canner. May, 2008. CAES News
Canned beans in a pressure canner. May, 2008.
Canning Tips
Foods produced during their natural growing season often have greater nutritional value, and canning enables consumers to have more control over their food by preserving seasonal produce.
Lyndon Waller, left, a DeKalb Mobile Farmers Market program assistant, and Rickeia Stewart, a UGA Extension administrative assistant in DeKalb County, are part of the team helping to bring fresh vegetables to underserved communities in DeKalb County. CAES News
Lyndon Waller, left, a DeKalb Mobile Farmers Market program assistant, and Rickeia Stewart, a UGA Extension administrative assistant in DeKalb County, are part of the team helping to bring fresh vegetables to underserved communities in DeKalb County.
Mobile Market Season
It’s almost summer, and for the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension staff in DeKalb and Clayton counties, that can only mean one thing — road trip!
Katrien Devos, a molecular geneticist at the University of Georgia, received at $1.8 million grant from National Science Foundation (NSF) in 2016 to help lay the groundwork to make finger millet more productive and disease resistant. CAES News
Katrien Devos, a molecular geneticist at the University of Georgia, received at $1.8 million grant from National Science Foundation (NSF) in 2016 to help lay the groundwork to make finger millet more productive and disease resistant.
Finger Millet
Relatively unknown outside of health food stores in the United States, millet has served as a staple food for families in Eastern Africa and Asia for thousands of years.