Browse Perennials Stories

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A crowd gathers at a past Ornamental Horticulture Research Field Day at UGA's Durham Horticulture Farm. This year's tour, which is free and open to the public, will be Oct. 6. CAES News
A crowd gathers at a past Ornamental Horticulture Research Field Day at UGA's Durham Horticulture Farm. This year's tour, which is free and open to the public, will be Oct. 6.
Horticulture Field Day
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) Department of Horticulture will host Ornamental Horticulture Research Field Day at UGA’s Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia, from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 6.
A silver-spotted skipper perches atop a rudbeckia triloba. The brown-centered coned-flowers have petals of yellow-orange that are produced in abundance from late summer into fall. Some references suggest it's biennial, or a short-lived perennial, while others call it a perennial that reseeds. CAES News
A silver-spotted skipper perches atop a rudbeckia triloba. The brown-centered coned-flowers have petals of yellow-orange that are produced in abundance from late summer into fall. Some references suggest it's biennial, or a short-lived perennial, while others call it a perennial that reseeds.
Brown-eyed Susan
It’s been 20 years since the Georgia Gold Medal program gave its prestigious award to one of the most persevering native perennials of all time, the Rudbeckia triloba. It is quite remarkable that a plant with no dazzling name other than the "three-lobed rudbeckia" or "brown-eyed Susan" staked a place not only in fame but also in the marketplace.
The shady, woodland garden at the Macon Museum of Arts and Sciences. CAES News
The shady, woodland garden at the Macon Museum of Arts and Sciences.
Native Plant Garden
The Native Plant Garden at the Museum of Arts and Sciences in Macon, Georgia, once thrived on the campus of Wesleyan College. A group of University of Georgia volunteers relocated it so that visitors to the museum can learn about native plants.
'Prairie Sun' produces flowers that are 5-inches wide. The large disk, or eye, of 'Prairie Sun' is green and generates glances from passing visitors. CAES News
'Prairie Sun' produces flowers that are 5-inches wide. The large disk, or eye, of 'Prairie Sun' is green and generates glances from passing visitors.
'Prairie Sun'
Fourteen years ago, ‘Prairie Sun,’ one of the most striking gloriosa daisies ever, was chosen as an All-America Selections award winner. This followed on the heels of ‘Indian Summer,’ another outstanding selection, and might have garnered all the love and attention it deserved. Thanks to progressive greenhouse growers and a new generation of landscape color professionals, this outstanding Rudbeckia hirta is generating a lot of dazzle in both commercial and homeowners’ landscapes. 
The 'Oakhurst' pineapple lily sports burgundy blushes. CAES News
The 'Oakhurst' pineapple lily sports burgundy blushes.
Pineapple Lily
With blooms that resemble a pineapple, the tropical-looking pineapple lily partners well with canna lilies, bananas and upright elephant ears. It also looks at home with ornamental grasses swaying in the breeze, partnered with drifts of flowers.
The UGA Tifton campus released the 'Cowboy' perennial peanut, which produces robust, yellow blooms. CAES News
The UGA Tifton campus released the 'Cowboy' perennial peanut, which produces robust, yellow blooms.
'Cowboy' Perennial Peanut
The University of Georgia-bred ‘Cowboy’ perennial peanut plant doesn’t produce edible peanuts, but this new cultivar offers homeowners a colorful addition to ornamental beds and a supplemental source of nitrogen for surrounding grasses.
This clump of Romano Dutch iris was planted almost 20 years ago in Savannah. CAES News
This clump of Romano Dutch iris was planted almost 20 years ago in Savannah.
Dutch Iris
The Dutch iris is relatively trouble-free and should bloom in May and June. Most references suggest a cold hardiness of zones 6 through 9, but gardeners tout a return in zone 5 when a protective layer of mulch has been added. They need plenty of sun to bloom their best, though a little afternoon shade would be tolerated.
'Ice Follies' daffodils return faithfully each year to the Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens in Savannah, Georgia. CAES News
'Ice Follies' daffodils return faithfully each year to the Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens in Savannah, Georgia.
Early Risers
With the arrival of the narcissus, the first hint of spring is trumpeting, so to speak, in the South.
University of Georgia horticulture professor Donglin Zhang worked with a team of American and Chinese scientists in fall 2016 to help identify tea varieties that might work well in the American South. Zhang and his colleagues visited tea fields in China as part of a research trip sponsored by the USDA and the Chinese Ministry of Agriculture. CAES News
University of Georgia horticulture professor Donglin Zhang worked with a team of American and Chinese scientists in fall 2016 to help identify tea varieties that might work well in the American South. Zhang and his colleagues visited tea fields in China as part of a research trip sponsored by the USDA and the Chinese Ministry of Agriculture.
Hometown Tea
Sweet tea may be the “house wine” of the American South, but very, very few of the tea leaves used in the thousands of gallons of tea Southerners drink every year is grown nearby.
Primulas offer unbelievable color during a dreary time of the year. CAES News
Primulas offer unbelievable color during a dreary time of the year.
Fake Flowers
“Primula” comes from the Latin word meaning “first of spring.” With 400 species of primulas to choose from, pick one and enjoy some 14 weeks of unimaginable color that no other plant can match.