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In addition to produce safety procedures, UGA Extension helps farmers develop record-keeping plans to help keep them in line with FDA food safety guidelines. Cory McCue of Woodland Gardens in Winterville, Georgia, makes notes about the farm's July harvest in the packinghouse while Christine White packs shishito peppers into 10-pound bags. CAES News
In addition to produce safety procedures, UGA Extension helps farmers develop record-keeping plans to help keep them in line with FDA food safety guidelines. Cory McCue of Woodland Gardens in Winterville, Georgia, makes notes about the farm's July harvest in the packinghouse while Christine White packs shishito peppers into 10-pound bags.
Produce Safety
Over the past decade, Americans have fallen in love with locally grown produce, but just because something is grown nearby doesn’t automatically make it safe.
Pictured is what downy mildew disease looks like on a watermelon leaf. Downy mildew disease has been found in three southern Georgia counties so far this spring. CAES News
Pictured is what downy mildew disease looks like on a watermelon leaf. Downy mildew disease has been found in three southern Georgia counties so far this spring.
Downy Mildew
Georgia vegetable farmers should be on alert as downy mildew disease has been spotted in at least three southern Georgia counties this spring. Additional counties could follow as weather conditions remain favorable for the disease into early June, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bhabesh Dutta.
Horticulture Professor Esther van der Knapp of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences worked with a team of geneticists around the world to create a fuller inventory of the genetic diversity of the tomato. They release a pangenome for the tomato in the May edition of Nature Genetics. (photos by Merritt Melancon) CAES News
Horticulture Professor Esther van der Knapp of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences worked with a team of geneticists around the world to create a fuller inventory of the genetic diversity of the tomato. They release a pangenome for the tomato in the May edition of Nature Genetics. (photos by Merritt Melancon)
Tomato Pan-genome
 It’s summer, and Georgia gardeners are anxiously awaiting their first tomato harvest. Just in time for those first tomato sandwiches, researchers at the University of Georgia have helped unlock the mystery of what separates today’s tomatoes from their inedible ancestors.
Bell peppers with blossom end rot symptoms caused by excess of sun light. CAES News
Bell peppers with blossom end rot symptoms caused by excess of sun light.
Unseasonably Hot
Georgia’s vegetable growers need to irrigate more frequently as unseasonably high temperatures are forecast to remain high with little to no rainfall expected. Andre da Silva, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist, said it is urgent that vegetable producers heed this advice.
Abolfazl Hajihassani, the Extension vegetable nematologist on the UGA Tifton campus, recently conducted a survey to gauge the impact of nematodes in vegetable fields in south Georgia. CAES News
Abolfazl Hajihassani, the Extension vegetable nematologist on the UGA Tifton campus, recently conducted a survey to gauge the impact of nematodes in vegetable fields in south Georgia.
Nematode Impact
A recent University of Georgia Cooperative Extension survey of 431 Georgia vegetable fields found that more than 60% contained root-knot nematodes, tiny parasitic worms that feed on roots and destroy plants.
Pictured is cabbage with black rot symptoms in a research trial on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Pictured is cabbage with black rot symptoms in a research trial on the UGA Tifton Campus.
Cabbage
As temperatures increase this spring, Georgia cabbage farmers should scout their crops regularly to ensure disease pressure is not too high, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Andre da Silva.
UGArden intern Lily Dabbs, a second-year geography major working toward a certificate in urban and metropolitan studies, delivers the first crop of UGArden vegetables to Ava Parisi, UGA Student Food Pantry director and a student majoring in health promotion and behavioral medicine. Photo by Vince Selvidge. CAES News
UGArden intern Lily Dabbs, a second-year geography major working toward a certificate in urban and metropolitan studies, delivers the first crop of UGArden vegetables to Ava Parisi, UGA Student Food Pantry director and a student majoring in health promotion and behavioral medicine. Photo by Vince Selvidge.
UGArden Donations
Food insecurity is an issue among college students that is rarely discussed but all too common. With limited funds or inconsistent income streams, some college students may have to choose between paying rent and buying groceries.
UGA plant pathologist Tim Brenneman received a Friends of Southern IPM award at the Georgia Association of Plant Pathologists annual meeting. CAES News
UGA plant pathologist Tim Brenneman received a Friends of Southern IPM award at the Georgia Association of Plant Pathologists annual meeting.
Plant Pathologists Recognized
Two University of Georgia plant pathologists in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences received the Friends of Southern Integrated Pest Management (IPM) awards at the Georgia Association of Plant Pathologists annual meeting in Savannah, Georgia on March 13.
Pictured are the symptoms of Alternaria leaf blight disease on brassica crops, including broccoli, collard and kale. Alternaria is a foliar pathogen, and symptoms first appear on older leaves as small, dark spots that gradually enlarge with concentric rings. CAES News
Pictured are the symptoms of Alternaria leaf blight disease on brassica crops, including broccoli, collard and kale. Alternaria is a foliar pathogen, and symptoms first appear on older leaves as small, dark spots that gradually enlarge with concentric rings.
Alternaria leaf blight
Popular vegetables like broccoli and kale are among the crops that could be in danger from Alternaria leaf blight — a disease that can cause spots on some brassica crops and render them unmarketable — which has developed resistance to a once-dependable fungicide Georgia farmers rely on, according to Bhabesh Dutta, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist.
Homegrown tomatoes are one of the most popular fruits available at roadside produce stands. CAES News
Homegrown tomatoes are one of the most popular fruits available at roadside produce stands.
Produce Training
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Department of Agriculture will host a free one-day workshop for produce farmers on Thursday, March 14, at Little Ocmulgee State Park in Helena, Georgia.