Browse Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Production Stories

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Georgia's peach crop is having a resurgence this year thanks to the lack of late freezes and sufficient chilling hours during the winter. CAES News
Georgia's peach crop is having a resurgence this year thanks to the lack of late freezes and sufficient chilling hours during the winter.
Backyard Fruits Webinar
Home gardeners who want to expand their edible backyard bounty to include fruits are invited to participate in the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Backyard Fruits webinar series that runs through June 5.
UGA researchers released new red 'RubyCrisp' muscadine variety for those who want a sweet berry flavor with just a hint of muscadine. CAES News
UGA researchers released new red 'RubyCrisp' muscadine variety for those who want a sweet berry flavor with just a hint of muscadine.
Sweet, Red Muscadine
From late summer into fall, Southerners start looking for muscadines — a popular grape native to the Southeastern U.S. Selections run from the dark purple, thick-skinned traditional muscadine to a light golden green variety. Soon, growers and consumers can add a new red variety to the mix.
Since it launched in 2013 and 2014, Georgia’s citrus industry has grown to about 2,000 acres of commercial citrus planted in southern Georgia, primarily cold-hardy satsumas. CAES News
Since it launched in 2013 and 2014, Georgia’s citrus industry has grown to about 2,000 acres of commercial citrus planted in southern Georgia, primarily cold-hardy satsumas.
Preserving Citrus Productivity
With commercial citrus acreage on the rise in Georgia, producers should be aware of potential signs of citrus greening and the pests that carry the disease that has devastated the citrus industry in Florida.
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees. CAES News
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees.
Ambrosia Beetles
Georgia pecan growers should be monitoring for ambrosia beetle now, especially if they have planted new trees or their orchards include trees that are less than three years old. The tell-tale sawdust “toothpicks” sticking out of trees is a sure sign of ambrosia beetles boring into trees.
San Jose scale is a sucking insect pest which damages fruit, like this peach, and can eventually kill a tree by injecting toxins. CAES News
San Jose scale is a sucking insect pest which damages fruit, like this peach, and can eventually kill a tree by injecting toxins.
San Jose Scale
San Jose Scale is predicted to be particularly bad this year for peach growers, as this pest is active in temperatures over 51 degrees Fahrenheit, “so we’ve already had a lot of days for this pest population to grow,” said University of Georgia Peach Entomologist Brett Blaauw.
Georgia Pollinator Plants of the Year CAES News
Georgia Pollinator Plants of the Year
Pollinator Plants
Native plants are the best habitat and food source for pollinators but they can be hard to find at garden centers or hardware stores.
August 8, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension will host a tour of four northeast Georgia vineyards, focusing on the cultivation practices and grape varieties that have made Georgia's burgeoning wine industry possible. CAES News
August 8, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension will host a tour of four northeast Georgia vineyards, focusing on the cultivation practices and grape varieties that have made Georgia's burgeoning wine industry possible.
Wine Producers Conference
The annual Georgia Wine Producers Conference will be held Feb. 3-4 at Chateau Elan in Braselton, Georgia. Researchers from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will be among the conference speakers.
UGA climatologists have developed a new formula for calculating wet bulb temperature, which will help farmers protect their fruit crops from late freezes. CAES News
UGA climatologists have developed a new formula for calculating wet bulb temperature, which will help farmers protect their fruit crops from late freezes.
Sketchy Weather
Georgia weather is predictably unpredictable, bitter cold one week and balmy the next. For that reason, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts urge Georgia growers to pay close attention to the weather over the coming months and be prepared to use irrigation for frost protection and potential dry conditions as we move into spring.
UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Horticulture's Professor Marc van Iersel, right, is leading an interdisciplinary team which hopes to integrate new lighting technologies, big data and better growing practices to reduce energy costs in greenhouses and plant factories. CAES News
UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Horticulture's Professor Marc van Iersel, right, is leading an interdisciplinary team which hopes to integrate new lighting technologies, big data and better growing practices to reduce energy costs in greenhouses and plant factories.
Start-up
The illuminated light bulb. It’s the symbol of a great idea come to life.
On March 1, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension will welcome Cain Hickey, the state's first full-time Extension viticulturist. CAES News
On March 1, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension will welcome Cain Hickey, the state's first full-time Extension viticulturist.
40 Under 40
Since arriving at the University of Georgia Department of Horticulture in 2017, viticulture researcher Cain Hickey has helped make UGA Cooperative Extension the go-to source for wine growing expertise in the Southeast.